Page 81 is created (or finished) by superimposing a replica (or reproduction) of page 244 (at a reduced size) on the surface of page 81 at an odd angle (with a Shadow effect added). For example: “There were already half a dozen estate cars…

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Page 81 is created (or finished) by superimposing a replica (or reproduction) of page 244 (at a reduced size) on the surface of page 81 at an odd angle (with a Shadow effect added). For example: “There were already half a dozen estate cars cast at odd angles on the high verges beyond the coned-off area around the church gate.” Likewise, page 114 is created (or finished) by superimposing a replica (or reproduction) of page 411 (at a reduced size) on the surface of page 114 at an odd angle (with a Shadow effect added). For example: “Across the road, Romanovsky pointed out a long trench running into the woods. The trench, he explained, had been formed when a wedge of underground ice had melted. The spruce trees that had been growing next to it, or perhaps on top of it, were now listing at odd angles, as if in a gale.”

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Triple question marks are attached to the conclusion of 23 sentences; each sentence is printed on its own page starting on p.161 (a novel)

Questionnaires have advantages over some other types of literature in that they are cheap, do not require as much effort from the questioner as verbal or telephone surveys, and often have standardized answers that make it simple to compile data. However, such standardized answers may frustrate users. Questionnaires are also sharply limited by the fact that respondents must be able to read the questions and respond to them.

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The word “Pink” is printed at the bottom left of p.32, followed (on p.33) by a 49,288 word excerpt from “The Pink Bunny”; on p.473 “Bunny” is printed at the bottom of the page (at left) followed by a sentence on p.474

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The title for the novel explains what is seen on/between p.32 through 474 and focuses on an excerpt from a novel titled “The Pink Bunny” about an abstract painter. The words “Pink” and “Bunny” are also the frame that serves to enclose the excerpt, created out of the reality of the title itself. The excerpt is followed by many blank pages, but this emptiness still exists within the frame of “Pink” and “Bunny.” The frame “Pink” and “Bunny” does not enclose the sentence on page 474.

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A small (0.9) Earth-mass, very temperate (67 °F.) high-manganese rocky silicate planet with almost 1.3 times the expected density and gravity and a coreless silicate moon. It has a hydrosphere of chilled iron pentacarbonyl slush actively cycling with…


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And so we turn to science fiction and fantasy in an attempt to re-enchant the world. Children and childhood retain mystery, and so one tactic has been to take fairytales and rewrite them for adults and here we get the swords and sorcery of modern fantasy. Another strategy was to reinsert the speculative unknown into the very heart of scientific processes. But just because we have mined myth for magic—and, remember, even what we define as myth would have been called religion two millennia early —does not mean that this fills the same need for wonder elsewhere.

One of the standard tropes in SF/fantasy—particularly fantasy for a long time—has been the strange cult. And so, as much as being an examination of real religion, it was intended to be an affectionate investing in that trope of the weird fantastic cults. Rather than constructing a world that is subordinate to the exigencies of the plot or theme or whatever, you create a world and then you inhabit it with stories and characters. This is something that non–genre people mock quite a lot, but it is an absolutely extraordinary thing to do. It’s an extraordinary aesthetic project and it can do things in certain ways that other genres cannot.​

“Square Box” symbols replace (most) characters (letters) between pages 6 and 638. You may see readable words among the formatting that was stripped out. In particular you notice three (three-letter) words (“ant”) printed on page 6…(Hardcover)

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It’s hard to argue that word problems, or puzzles, used as they are in our schools as disposable exercises, could be lived with over time, and seen to have inexhaustible levels of meaning (as a parable in the religious sense), particularly poetic meaning about the depths of human experience. There is certainly the element of the indescribable involved in mathematical concepts, particularly those that deal with infinity, or with entities that exist perhaps only as mental images.

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The paragraph that is printed on page 9 and reprinted on pages 10 thru 356 is not seen on pages 1 thru 8, and page 123


The argument of this novel is to establish that the front matter (pages 1-8) of the book does not include the primary text, a paragraph made of 17 sentences, which is printed on p.9 and subsequently reprinted on the pages referenced in the title, except page 123, where the paragraph is not seen.

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Is the neighborhood safe? The map (see example on the cover of the book) gives users a Gist of how dangerous it is in different parts of a city down to specific streets and blocks by using an intuitive color-coded scheme known as “heatmap.” Blocks with 0-30 incidents of crime per year are shown in green while the ones with 160 incidents or displayed as red…

The so-called “Dummy” or (filler or Placeholder) text is a modified edition of Dostoyevsky’s Crime and Punishment by utilizing Constance Garnett’s translation of ‘Part I’ as the base text. Dostoyevsky’s text is rearranged into verse paragraphs that form a rhetorical unit similar to that of a prose paragraph. The paragraphs that utilize the word ‘landlady’ are italicized, therefore, the “landlady” character in Dostoyevsky’s text is conceptually tied with the characters (whose names are also italicized) mentioned in the title; Ike, Benjy, and Darl (as created by William Faulkner for his novel The Sound and the Fury). The Faulkner quote (see title on the front cover) is a reference to his novel The Sound and the Fury. Faulkner readily acknowledged the difficulty of what he’d written and proposed using different-colored inks as a way to make Benjy’s section more accessible, with distinct shades assigned to its crisscrossed time-settings. Therefore, a “heatmap” (see the image on the front cover) is a graphical representation of data where the individual values contained in a matrix are represented as colors. Rainbow colormaps are often used, as humans can perceive more shades of color than they can of gray, and this would purportedly increase the amount of detail perceivable in the image. Therefore, the text of the header is composed of sentences printed in different colored inks. ​

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The Conceptual Literature of Todd Van Buskirk