274 pages of Joanne Richardson’s “The piano quintet: Influence of medium on genre” (2014, Unpublished Doctoral thesis, City University London) are merged with the 221 pages of Emily S. Gertsch’s “Narratives of Innocence and Experience: Plot Archetypes in Robert Schumann’s Piano Quintet and Piano Quartet” (2013, Doctoral thesis, The Florida State University College of Music). Each document features numbered chapters, examples, tables and figures that are listed in the table of contents at the beginning of each document (therefore each document has its own page numbering). Richardson’s document holds 6 chapters, 162 musical examples and 3 figures. Gertsch’s document holds 8 chapters, 103 musical examples, 17 tables and 8 figures.

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(piano quintet)
274 pages of Joanne Richardson’s “The piano quintet: Influence of medium on genre” (2014, Unpublished Doctoral thesis, City University London) are merged with the 221 pages of Emily S. Gertsch’s “Narratives of Innocence and Experience: Plot Archetypes in Robert Schumann’s Piano Quintet and Piano Quartet” (2013, Doctoral thesis, The Florida State University College of Music). Each document features numbered chapters, examples, tables and figures that are listed in the table of contents at the beginning of each document (therefore each document has its own page numbering). Richardson’s document holds 6 chapters, 162 musical examples and 3 figures. Gertsch’s document holds 8 chapters, 103 musical examples, 17 tables and 8 figures.

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(Piano Trio) There are 109 footnotes, 52 examples, 6 appendixes and 1 bibliography that support an individual analysis and comparison of the ‘original version’ and the ‘revised version’ of Brahms’s Piano Trio in B Major, Op.8 (Mvt.1). The examples regarding the original version are examples 1-6, 12-17, 20-24, 41-43, 45, 46a, 47, and 51. The examples regarding the ‘revised version’ are examples 26, 28-41, 42, 44, 46b, 48, 49, 50, and 52. Not every example is a segment from a score. There is 1 timeline, 8 schematics, 6 calculations, 2 lists and 4 graphs. Appendices A, B, and C regard the ‘original version’ and appendices D, E, and F regard the ‘revised’ version.

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There are 109 footnotes, 52 examples, 6 appendixes and 1 bibliography that support an individual analysis and comparison of the ‘original version’ and the ‘revised version’ of Brahms’s Piano Trio in B Major, Op.8 (Mvt.1). The examples regarding the original version are examples 1-6, 12-17, 20-24, 41-43, 45, 46a, 47, and 51. The examples regarding the ‘revised version’ are examples 26, 28-41, 42, 44, 46b, 48, 49, 50, and 52. Not every example is a segment from a score. There is 1 timeline, 8 schematics, 6 calculations, 2 lists and 4 graphs. Appendices A, B, and C regard the ‘original version’ and appendices D, E, and F regard the ‘revised’ version.

There are problems with the size of 69 figures in this dissertation from 1968, “An Analysis of Brahms, Quintet in B Minor, Op.115, for Clarinet and Strings,” making it difficult to decipher each figure in detail. There are also problems with the awkward placement of the music staves in the figures, such as figure 12 on page 17 and figure 64 on pages 52-53 (to name a few). Figure 14 on page 18 and Figure 39 on page 38 (to name a few) are printed too close to the bottom of the page, nearly outside of the trim line and into the bleed area. In Figure 5 on page 12, the note heads for the clarinet and cello staves are faded as a result of a common printing problem.

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There are problems with the size of 69 figures in this dissertation from 1968, “An Analysis of Brahms, Quintet in B Minor, Op.115, for Clarinet and Strings,” making it difficult to decipher each figure in detail. There are also problems with the awkward placement of the music staves in the figures, such as figure 12 on page 17 and figure 64 on pages 52-53 (to name a few). Figure 14 on page 18 and Figure 39 on page 38 (to name a few) are printed too close to the bottom of the page, nearly outside of the trim line and into the bleed area. In Figure 5 on page 12, the note heads for the clarinet and cello staves are faded as a result of a common printing problem.

(Clarinet Quintet)

There are unnecessary page numbers (on pages that are necessary) within the front matter, i.e., Roman numerals on (Page) i, ii, iii, iv, v and vi. There is another on (page) xii. After (page) xii there are more starting on page 1 and 2. Page numbers…

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Numbering pages started out not as a tool for readers but a guide for those who physically produced books. In Latin manuscripts copied in the British Isles as far back as the eighth or ninth century, numbering was sometimes used to ensure that individual sheets of parchment were collated in the correct order. In some cases, numbers appeared on both the recto and verso pages, but other times, only one side of the page bore a number. Use of numbering was sparse. It’s been estimated that around 1450—just before the birth of printing in the West—less than 10 percent of manuscript books contained pagination.

Fifty years later, the proportion of now-printed works with pagination was much higher. Part of the change reflected the new role of page numbers. Rather than strictly being tools for compiling leaves in the proper order, by the 1510s scholars were starting to refer to page numbers of printed volumes in their own writing.

When publishers wish to distinguish between the front matter and the story, the initial title pages are not numbered, the front matter is numbered using lower-case Roman numerals (i, ii, iii, etc.) and the first page of the story or main content begins with one. The title page of the story is not numbered, but if a story is broken into multiple parts (Part I, Part II, etc.), the title page for the section may be included in the numbering but not shown on the page. The first page of Chapter One would then be numbered as page three rather than page one as would be the normal case.

The sixteenth edition of the Chicago Manual of Style calls for the beginning of the text to begin with the Arabic number 1, while the front matter that precedes it is to be numbered with lower-case Roman numerals. If the front matter is extensive and a second half-title page is included, it is to be numbered as page one and its verso as page two. If a part title is included, it is to be included in the same numbering as the text. Page numbers do not appear on part titles. Most citation systems also call for the identification of the page number from which a quote or point is drawn. For example, such usage is specified in their citation formats of both the Chicago Manual of Style, and the Bluebook.

Page 81 is created (or finished) by superimposing a replica (or reproduction) of page 244 (at a reduced size) on the surface of page 81 at an odd angle (with a Shadow effect added). For example: “There were already half a dozen estate cars…

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Page 81 is created (or finished) by superimposing a replica (or reproduction) of page 244 (at a reduced size) on the surface of page 81 at an odd angle (with a Shadow effect added). For example: “There were already half a dozen estate cars cast at odd angles on the high verges beyond the coned-off area around the church gate.” Likewise, page 114 is created (or finished) by superimposing a replica (or reproduction) of page 411 (at a reduced size) on the surface of page 114 at an odd angle (with a Shadow effect added). For example: “Across the road, Romanovsky pointed out a long trench running into the woods. The trench, he explained, had been formed when a wedge of underground ice had melted. The spruce trees that had been growing next to it, or perhaps on top of it, were now listing at odd angles, as if in a gale.”

Triple question marks are attached to the conclusion of 23 sentences; each sentence is printed on its own page starting on p.161 (a novel)

Questionnaires have advantages over some other types of literature in that they are cheap, do not require as much effort from the questioner as verbal or telephone surveys, and often have standardized answers that make it simple to compile data. However, such standardized answers may frustrate users. Questionnaires are also sharply limited by the fact that respondents must be able to read the questions and respond to them.

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The word “Pink” is printed at the bottom left of p.32, followed (on p.33) by a 49,288 word excerpt from “The Pink Bunny”; on p.473 “Bunny” is printed at the bottom of the page (at left) followed by a sentence on p.474

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The title for the novel explains what is seen on/between p.32 through 474 and focuses on an excerpt from a novel titled “The Pink Bunny” about an abstract painter. The words “Pink” and “Bunny” are also the frame that serves to enclose the excerpt, created out of the reality of the title itself. The excerpt is followed by many blank pages, but this emptiness still exists within the frame of “Pink” and “Bunny.” The frame “Pink” and “Bunny” does not enclose the sentence on page 474.

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The Conceptual Literature of Todd Van Buskirk