Tag Archives: literature

There are unnecessary page numbers (on pages that are necessary) within the front matter, i.e., Roman numerals on (Page) i, ii, iii, iv, v and vi. There is another on (page) xii. After (page) xii there are more starting on page 1 and 2. Page numbers…

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Numbering pages started out not as a tool for readers but a guide for those who physically produced books. In Latin manuscripts copied in the British Isles as far back as the eighth or ninth century, numbering was sometimes used to ensure that individual sheets of parchment were collated in the correct order. In some cases, numbers appeared on both the recto and verso pages, but other times, only one side of the page bore a number. Use of numbering was sparse. It’s been estimated that around 1450—just before the birth of printing in the West—less than 10 percent of manuscript books contained pagination.

Fifty years later, the proportion of now-printed works with pagination was much higher. Part of the change reflected the new role of page numbers. Rather than strictly being tools for compiling leaves in the proper order, by the 1510s scholars were starting to refer to page numbers of printed volumes in their own writing.

When publishers wish to distinguish between the front matter and the story, the initial title pages are not numbered, the front matter is numbered using lower-case Roman numerals (i, ii, iii, etc.) and the first page of the story or main content begins with one. The title page of the story is not numbered, but if a story is broken into multiple parts (Part I, Part II, etc.), the title page for the section may be included in the numbering but not shown on the page. The first page of Chapter One would then be numbered as page three rather than page one as would be the normal case.

The sixteenth edition of the Chicago Manual of Style calls for the beginning of the text to begin with the Arabic number 1, while the front matter that precedes it is to be numbered with lower-case Roman numerals. If the front matter is extensive and a second half-title page is included, it is to be numbered as page one and its verso as page two. If a part title is included, it is to be included in the same numbering as the text. Page numbers do not appear on part titles. Most citation systems also call for the identification of the page number from which a quote or point is drawn. For example, such usage is specified in their citation formats of both the Chicago Manual of Style, and the Bluebook.

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Triple question marks are attached to the conclusion of 23 sentences; each sentence is printed on its own page starting on p.161 (a novel)

Questionnaires have advantages over some other types of literature in that they are cheap, do not require as much effort from the questioner as verbal or telephone surveys, and often have standardized answers that make it simple to compile data. However, such standardized answers may frustrate users. Questionnaires are also sharply limited by the fact that respondents must be able to read the questions and respond to them.

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The paragraph that is printed on page 9 and reprinted on pages 10 thru 356 is not seen on pages 1 thru 8, and page 123


The argument of this novel is to establish that the front matter (pages 1-8) of the book does not include the primary text, a paragraph made of 17 sentences, which is printed on p.9 and subsequently reprinted on the pages referenced in the title, except page 123, where the paragraph is not seen.

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They place his given-name (“Todd”) on pages 25 through 58. Then they place his middle names (“Earl”) on p.322 and (“Winkels”) on pages 356 through 411. Then they place his Catholic confirmation name (“Augustine”) on p.455…


The word ‘autobiography’ was first used deprecatingly by William Taylor in 1797 in the English periodical the Monthly Review, when he suggested the word as a hybrid but condemned it as ‘pedantic’; but its next recorded use was in its present sense by Robert Southey in 1809. The form of autobiography however goes back to antiquity. Biographers generally rely on a wide variety of documents and viewpoints; an autobiography, however, may be based entirely on the writer’s memory. 
Autobiographical works are by nature subjective. The inability — or unwillingness — of the author to accurately recall memories has in certain cases resulted in misleading or incorrect information. Some sociologists and psychologists have noted that autobiography offers the author the ability to recreate history.
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Hugo Ball: Flight Out of Time: A Dada Diary (1927–)


From this blog
“Hugo Ball—poet, philosopher, novelist, cabaret performer, journalist, mystic—was a man extremely sensitive to the currents of his time and carried in their wake. In February 1916 he founded the Cabaret Voltaire in Zurich. The sound poems and performance art by Ball and the other artists who gathered there were the beginnings of Dada. Ball’s extraordinary diaries, one of the most significant products of the Dada movement, are here available in English, along with the original Dada manifesto and John Elderfield’s critical introduction, revised and updated for this edition, and a supplementary bibliography of Dada texts.”

No one has a good idea how the front and back images of a crucified man came to be on the cloth. No one has created images that match the chemistry, peculiar superficiality and profoundly mysterious three-dimensional information content of the images on the Shroud…

​No one has a good idea how the front and back images of a crucified man came to be on the cloth. No one has created images that match the chemistry, peculiar superficiality and profoundly mysterious three-dimensional information content of the images on the Shroud. Therefore, they compacted trash and recycling in a Stationary Compactor (there is an example on page 7). They put a ’tilt truck’ (see example on p.115) into a Cart Dumper (see example on p.120) of which there are two; one for trash and one for recycle. The two Cart Dumpers work by using a hydraulic arm to lift the tilt truck (through a ninety degree angle) dumping its contents into the compactor, to be crushed and compacted. Therefore, there are two photographs of the floor of The Cart Dumpers on p.27 and there are a two photographs of the Shroud of Turin on p.111. On p.45 the two photographs from page 27 are placed above the two photographs from p.111 (for a total of four photographs on one page). Therefore, they conclude (for now) that the Wear and Tear on the Floor of the Cart Dumpers and the two Images within the Shroud of Turin show the Front and Back of a scourged, crucified man. They said, “These hard times can last us so very long, If I ever get off this Killing Floor, I’ll never get down this low no more, and you say you had money, you better be sure, ‘Cause these hard times will drive you from door to door.” (After Skip James)

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One 258,226 word sentence begins on p.11, continues on p.205, and ends on p.592

 

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One 258, 226 word sentence passes through three novels. A trilogy (from Greek τρι- tri-, “three” and -λογία -logia, “discourse”) is a set of three works of art that are connected, and that can be seen either as a single work or as three individual works. They are commonly found in literature, film, or video games. Three-part works that are considered components of a larger work also exist, such as the triptych or the three-movement sonata, but they are not commonly referred to with the term “trilogy.”

Van Buskirk was attracted to the ‘three novel’ book format through Samuel Beckett’s The Trilogy, consisting of three novels, Molloy, Malone Dies, and The Unnamable. Taken together, these three novels represent the high-water mark of the literary movement we call Modernism. Within their linguistic terrain, where stories are taken up, broken off, and taken up again, where voices rise and crumble and are resurrected, we can discern the essential lineaments of our modern condition, and encounter an awesome vision, tragic yet always compelling and always mysteriously invigorating, of consciousness trapped and struggling inside the boundaries of nature.