Category Archives: Van Buskirk Books

They place his given-name (“Todd”) on pages 25 through 58. Then they place his middle names (“Earl”) on p.322 and (“Winkels”) on pages 356 through 411. Then they place his Catholic confirmation name (“Augustine”) on p.455…


The word ‘autobiography’ was first used deprecatingly by William Taylor in 1797 in the English periodical the Monthly Review, when he suggested the word as a hybrid but condemned it as ‘pedantic’; but its next recorded use was in its present sense by Robert Southey in 1809. The form of autobiography however goes back to antiquity. Biographers generally rely on a wide variety of documents and viewpoints; an autobiography, however, may be based entirely on the writer’s memory. 
Autobiographical works are by nature subjective. The inability — or unwillingness — of the author to accurately recall memories has in certain cases resulted in misleading or incorrect information. Some sociologists and psychologists have noted that autobiography offers the author the ability to recreate history.
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No one has a good idea how the front and back images of a crucified man came to be on the cloth. No one has created images that match the chemistry, peculiar superficiality and profoundly mysterious three-dimensional information content of the images on the Shroud…

​No one has a good idea how the front and back images of a crucified man came to be on the cloth. No one has created images that match the chemistry, peculiar superficiality and profoundly mysterious three-dimensional information content of the images on the Shroud. Therefore, they compacted trash and recycling in a Stationary Compactor (there is an example on page 7). They put a ’tilt truck’ (see example on p.115) into a Cart Dumper (see example on p.120) of which there are two; one for trash and one for recycle. The two Cart Dumpers work by using a hydraulic arm to lift the tilt truck (through a ninety degree angle) dumping its contents into the compactor, to be crushed and compacted. Therefore, there are two photographs of the floor of The Cart Dumpers on p.27 and there are a two photographs of the Shroud of Turin on p.111. On p.45 the two photographs from page 27 are placed above the two photographs from p.111 (for a total of four photographs on one page). Therefore, they conclude (for now) that the Wear and Tear on the Floor of the Cart Dumpers and the two Images within the Shroud of Turin show the Front and Back of a scourged, crucified man. They said, “These hard times can last us so very long, If I ever get off this Killing Floor, I’ll never get down this low no more, and you say you had money, you better be sure, ‘Cause these hard times will drive you from door to door.” (After Skip James)

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“I promise there are two pages between pages 34 and 37. They promise there are ten pages between pages 122 and 133. She promises there are twenty-four pages between pages 201 and 226. He promises there are…”


Recognition of the significance of speech acts has illuminated the ability of language to do other things than describe reality. In the process the boundaries among the philosophy of language, the philosophy of action, aesthetics, the philosophy of mind, political philosophy, and ethics have become less sharp. In addition, an appreciation of speech acts has helped lay bare a normative structure implicit in linguistic practice, including even that part of this practice concerned with describing reality.

 

Austin famously claimed that performatives are not statements (1962, p. 6). This may be taken either as the claim that performative sentences, even those in the indicative grammatical mood, lack truth value; or instead as the claim that utterances of performative sentences, even when such sentences have truth value, are not assertions. One can consistently hold that an indicative sentence has truth value, and even that it may be uttered in such a way as to say something true, while denying that its utterance is an assertion. (Testing a microphone in a windowless room, I utter, “It’s raining,” and it happens to be raining outside. Here I have said something true but have made no assertion.)

 

Lemmon 1962 argues that performative utterances are true on the ground that they are instances of a wider class of sentences whose utterance guarantees their truth. If sound, this argument would show that performatives have truth value, but not that they are assertions. It also leaves unanswered the question why some verb phrases such as ‘I promise’ may be used performatively while others cannot be so used. Sinnott-Armstrong 1994 also argues that performatives can have truth value without addressing the question whether they are also used to make assertions. Reimer 1995 argues that while performatives have truth values, they are not also assertions. Adopting a similar strategy, Jary 2007 aims to explain how utterances of such sentences as “I order you to clean the kitchen,” can succeed in being orders. In so doing he draws on Green’s 2007 analysis of showing to argue that such utterances show (rather than merely describe) the force of the speaker’s utterance. Because ‘show’ is factive, if such an utterance shows its force, then it must have that force.

 

Searle 1969 had argued that a performative formula such as “I promise to…” is an “illocutionary force indicator” in the sense that it is a device whose role is to make explicit the force of the speaker’s utterance. Making something explicit, however, would seem to involve characterizing an independent event or state of affairs, and as a result Searle’s account presupposes that speakers can imbue their utterances with the force of demotions and excommunications; yet this is what was to be explained.

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The Concert Register of Carlo Maria Giulini (1914-2005) is printed (starting on page 7) with every concert featuring the music of Anton Bruckner (1824-1896) printed in the color of red (the frontispiece on page 2 is a reference to this idea). The inspiration for printing the words of Jesus in red comes from Luke 22:20 – “This cup is the new testament in my blood, which I shed for you”. On June 19, 1899, Louis Klopsch (1852-1910)…

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The Concert Register of Carlo Maria Giulini (1914-2005) is printed (starting on page 7) with every concert featuring the music of Anton Bruckner (1824-1896) printed in the color of red (the frontispiece on page 2 is a reference to this idea). The inspiration for printing the words of Jesus in red comes from Luke 22:20 – “This cup is the new testament in my blood, which I shed for you”. On June 19, 1899, Louis Klopsch (1852-1910) conceived the idea while working on an editorial. Klopsch asked his mentor Rev. T. De Witt Talmage what he thought of a testament with the words spoken by Jesus printed in red ink and Dr. Talmage replied, “It could do no harm and it most certainly could do much good.”

One 258,226 word sentence begins on p.11, continues on p.205, and ends on p.592

 

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One 258, 226 word sentence passes through three novels. A trilogy (from Greek τρι- tri-, “three” and -λογία -logia, “discourse”) is a set of three works of art that are connected, and that can be seen either as a single work or as three individual works. They are commonly found in literature, film, or video games. Three-part works that are considered components of a larger work also exist, such as the triptych or the three-movement sonata, but they are not commonly referred to with the term “trilogy.”

Van Buskirk was attracted to the ‘three novel’ book format through Samuel Beckett’s The Trilogy, consisting of three novels, Molloy, Malone Dies, and The Unnamable. Taken together, these three novels represent the high-water mark of the literary movement we call Modernism. Within their linguistic terrain, where stories are taken up, broken off, and taken up again, where voices rise and crumble and are resurrected, we can discern the essential lineaments of our modern condition, and encounter an awesome vision, tragic yet always compelling and always mysteriously invigorating, of consciousness trapped and struggling inside the boundaries of nature.

 

a Fake Vincent Van Gogh (1853-90) landscape is located on p.168 and 169 as a double-page spread. The Margin of the gutter divides the Image in two. The dimensions of the image on p.168 are 1042 X 1024 pixels and the image on p.169 is 1005 X 1024 pixels.

 

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Debates have arisen as to whether all biographies are fiction, especially when authors are writing about figures from the past. All history is seen through a perspective that is the product of our contemporary society and as a result biographical truths are constantly shifting. So the history biographers write about will not be the way that it happened. It will be the way they remembered it. Debates have also arisen concerning the importance of space in life writing.

On the other hand,  some years ago the Art Newspaper named eighteen “Van Goghs” in public collections that had been downgraded as fakes or are works of questionable authenticity. Most of them were taken off display, including pictures in the Van Gogh Museum, the Kröller-Müller Museum, the Detroit Institute of Arts and the Nationalmuseum in Stockholm.

Well recorded is the controversy reigning for many years regarding the authenticity of some forty oil paintings previously attributed to the Dutch master artist Vincent van Gogh. Believed by some commentators and van Gogh art experts, these works of art may in fact actually have been executed by one of Vincent van Gogh’s pupils, perhaps someone within van Gogh’s circle or even may be deliberately faked variations of Vincent van Gogh’s art works. But this is controversial and if so, a fraud effected right back at the turn of the last century. Art scholars and expert historians alike constantly challenge and raise issues about van Gogh’s oeuvre and presumably will continue to do so.

The margin space on the page between the binding and the inside edge illustration or any printed element is called the gutter. At some time you unquestionably experienced an insufficient gutter. You open a book to find that the text’s inside edge is partially obscured by the tight binding. You force the book to open wider and ultimately break its binding. Printing and binding technology has become highly precise, but some variance is inevitable. This book shows the image of the painting divided in two by means of a generous gutter.

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Examples of 2 Sentence paragraphs… (a play)

Examples of 2 sentence paragraphs are located on pages 33, 53, 56, 79 and 80, and collected into a monologue on p.340

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The title of this drama provides the stage directions. Based on the title, the Dramatis Personae is also as follows:

Page 33
Page 53
Page 56
Page 79
Page 80
Page 340

The Sapir–Whorf hypothesis in linguistics states that the grammatical structure of a mother language influences the way we perceive the world. The hypothesis has been largely abandoned by linguists as it has found very limited experimental support, at least in its strong form. “We cut nature up, organize it into concepts, and ascribe significances as we do, largely because we are parties to an agreement to organize it in this way – an agreement that holds throughout our speech community and is codified in the patterns of our language. The agreement is, of course, an implicit and unstated one, but its terms are absolutely obligatory; we cannot talk at all except by subscribing to the organization and classification of data which the agreement decrees.” – Whorf