Tag Archives: critique

There are unnecessary page numbers (on pages that are necessary) within the front matter, i.e., Roman numerals on (Page) i, ii, iii, iv, v and vi. There is another on (page) xii. After (page) xii there are more starting on page 1 and 2. Page numbers…

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Numbering pages started out not as a tool for readers but a guide for those who physically produced books. In Latin manuscripts copied in the British Isles as far back as the eighth or ninth century, numbering was sometimes used to ensure that individual sheets of parchment were collated in the correct order. In some cases, numbers appeared on both the recto and verso pages, but other times, only one side of the page bore a number. Use of numbering was sparse. It’s been estimated that around 1450—just before the birth of printing in the West—less than 10 percent of manuscript books contained pagination.

Fifty years later, the proportion of now-printed works with pagination was much higher. Part of the change reflected the new role of page numbers. Rather than strictly being tools for compiling leaves in the proper order, by the 1510s scholars were starting to refer to page numbers of printed volumes in their own writing.

When publishers wish to distinguish between the front matter and the story, the initial title pages are not numbered, the front matter is numbered using lower-case Roman numerals (i, ii, iii, etc.) and the first page of the story or main content begins with one. The title page of the story is not numbered, but if a story is broken into multiple parts (Part I, Part II, etc.), the title page for the section may be included in the numbering but not shown on the page. The first page of Chapter One would then be numbered as page three rather than page one as would be the normal case.

The sixteenth edition of the Chicago Manual of Style calls for the beginning of the text to begin with the Arabic number 1, while the front matter that precedes it is to be numbered with lower-case Roman numerals. If the front matter is extensive and a second half-title page is included, it is to be numbered as page one and its verso as page two. If a part title is included, it is to be included in the same numbering as the text. Page numbers do not appear on part titles. Most citation systems also call for the identification of the page number from which a quote or point is drawn. For example, such usage is specified in their citation formats of both the Chicago Manual of Style, and the Bluebook.

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Triple question marks are attached to the conclusion of 23 sentences; each sentence is printed on its own page starting on p.161 (a novel)

Questionnaires have advantages over some other types of literature in that they are cheap, do not require as much effort from the questioner as verbal or telephone surveys, and often have standardized answers that make it simple to compile data. However, such standardized answers may frustrate users. Questionnaires are also sharply limited by the fact that respondents must be able to read the questions and respond to them.

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The word “Pink” is printed at the bottom left of p.32, followed (on p.33) by a 49,288 word excerpt from “The Pink Bunny”; on p.473 “Bunny” is printed at the bottom of the page (at left) followed by a sentence on p.474

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The title for the novel explains what is seen on/between p.32 through 474 and focuses on an excerpt from a novel titled “The Pink Bunny” about an abstract painter. The words “Pink” and “Bunny” are also the frame that serves to enclose the excerpt, created out of the reality of the title itself. The excerpt is followed by many blank pages, but this emptiness still exists within the frame of “Pink” and “Bunny.” The frame “Pink” and “Bunny” does not enclose the sentence on page 474.

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There are 3 maps based on Science fiction that center around a small (0.9) Earth-mass, very temperate (67 °F.) high-manganese rocky silicate planet with almost 1.3 times the expected density and gravity…

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And so we turn to science fiction and fantasy in an attempt to re-enchant the world. Children and childhood retain mystery, and so one tactic has been to take fairytales and rewrite them for adults and here we get the swords and sorcery of modern fantasy. Another strategy was to reinsert the speculative unknown into the very heart of scientific processes. But just because we have mined myth for magic—and, remember, even what we define as myth would have been called religion two millennia early —does not mean that this fills the same need for wonder elsewhere.

One of the standard tropes in SF/fantasy—particularly fantasy for a long time—has been the strange cult. And so, as much as being an examination of real religion, it was intended to be an affectionate investing in that trope of the weird fantastic cults. Rather than constructing a world that is subordinate to the exigencies of the plot or theme or whatever, you create a world and then you inhabit it with stories and characters. This is something that non–genre people mock quite a lot, but it is an absolutely extraordinary thing to do. It’s an extraordinary aesthetic project and it can do things in certain ways that other genres cannot.

The paragraph that is printed on page 9 and reprinted on pages 10 thru 356 is not seen on pages 1 thru 8, and page 123


The argument of this novel is to establish that the front matter (pages 1-8) of the book does not include the primary text, a paragraph made of 17 sentences, which is printed on p.9 and subsequently reprinted on the pages referenced in the title, except page 123, where the paragraph is not seen.

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Thomas McEvilley: The Triumph of Anti-Art: Conceptual and Performance Art in the Formation of Post-Modernism (2005) — Monoskop Log

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“From roughly 1965 to 1980, Conceptual Art and Performance Art took center stage throughout the western world, introducing new and complex ideas to the practice of contemporary art which reverberate to this day. Thomas McEvilley’s The Triumph of Anti-Art not only explains the origins of these controversial and compelling art forms, but also uncovers many relatively unrecognized yet indisputably important artists, American and European. He guides the reader through a thicket of seemingly arcane meanings of these nonrepresentational art form, and brings clarity to the intentions and agendas of these artists, as well as to their real world contexts. The long-term effects of “anti-art,” and the development of the pluralistic situation known as post-Modernism, are described in vivid detail…”

The story starts with the boy contemplating Father Flynn’s illness and impending death (see the sentence fragment that is printed on p.11). He is fascinated with interpreting signs and symbols, and their meaning (see the sentence fragment that is printed on p.27). Later, while the boy eats his dinner, his aunt, uncle, and old Cotter have a conversation in which the boy is informed that the priest has died (see the sentence fragment that is printed on p.34)…


(nine stories)

​The text is constructed by utilizing a nine sentence summary of James Joyce’s The Sisters and modifying the nine sentences into nine sentence fragments (see the “contents” page in the front matter). The pages (starting on p.8) that don’t have a fragment are intentionally left blank (except for the header). 

The famous red and blue dust jacket for Salinger’s Nine Stories was designed by Miriam Woods. The striking, unillustrated jacket resulted from the Salinger’s refusal to allow the publisher to depict the characters of any of the stories, in order to prevent readers from approaching the stories with preconceptions about the characters. The heart of each story is set to the beat of its characters – to unfussy accounts of the way in which they move through the world and interact with one another, to the cautious articulation of their understated feelings and nascent beliefs. This most often takes the form of a child in haphazard conversation with a newly encountered adult. His adults are characteristically broken by habit and suffering “the ruthless cruelty of conventional social judgments and behavior”, and this is a condition rendered all the more stark when positioned alongside the unassuming wisdom of the very young.
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