Category Archives: Artist’s Morgue

Thomas McEvilley: The Triumph of Anti-Art: Conceptual and Performance Art in the Formation of Post-Modernism (2005) — Monoskop Log

Link to article and PDF

“From roughly 1965 to 1980, Conceptual Art and Performance Art took center stage throughout the western world, introducing new and complex ideas to the practice of contemporary art which reverberate to this day. Thomas McEvilley’s The Triumph of Anti-Art not only explains the origins of these controversial and compelling art forms, but also uncovers many relatively unrecognized yet indisputably important artists, American and European. He guides the reader through a thicket of seemingly arcane meanings of these nonrepresentational art form, and brings clarity to the intentions and agendas of these artists, as well as to their real world contexts. The long-term effects of “anti-art,” and the development of the pluralistic situation known as post-Modernism, are described in vivid detail…”

Advertisements

Hugo Ball: Flight Out of Time: A Dada Diary (1927–)


From this blog
“Hugo Ball—poet, philosopher, novelist, cabaret performer, journalist, mystic—was a man extremely sensitive to the currents of his time and carried in their wake. In February 1916 he founded the Cabaret Voltaire in Zurich. The sound poems and performance art by Ball and the other artists who gathered there were the beginnings of Dada. Ball’s extraordinary diaries, one of the most significant products of the Dada movement, are here available in English, along with the original Dada manifesto and John Elderfield’s critical introduction, revised and updated for this edition, and a supplementary bibliography of Dada texts.”

Blade Runner Comic

http://www.brmovie.com/Comic/index.htm


“Blade Runner” (Marvel Special Edition) is readable online—(via @klaustoon)

One of the well known tie-ins to the Blade Runner film is the Blade Runner comic. It was issued in two volumes and a combined edition. 

The Blade Runner comic is very interesting for its interpretation of the movie. Quite obviously, they can’t possibly do the same in a comic as in a 2 hour movie, so one expects that some dialogue will be trimmed or even slightly changed and details in the action will be curtailed or perhaps adjusted. One of the things I find most interesting is that some of those differences from the original movie version are referencing the shooting script! So, while there is some interpretation and a particular perspective present, it is in some ways almost like a different cut of the film.

Lines of Thought 

http://www.artinamericamagazine.com/news-features/magazine/lines-of-thought/


The traveling survey of Agnes Martin’s work that debuted this summer at Tate Modern in London offers an opportunity to reconsider an artist who seems easy to know. Martin is generally pictured as a sage of the desert dispensing measured lines of graphite, pale paint and gnomic prose with ritual changelessness. In and around New York, she is perhaps best known as one of those select few whose work is semi-permanently enshrined at Dia:Beacon, high church of Minimalism and citadel against all forms of personal contingency. To lay out the narrative arc of Martin’s development, as the present exhibition does, is a welcome corrective. 

Terms and Comditions – The Graphic Novel

http://www.strandbooks.com/event/r-sikoryak-terms-and-conditions


New Yorker cartoonist R. Sikoryak launches his latest graphic novel, Terms and Conditions. For this project, Sikoryak tackles an infamously dense legal document, the iTunes Terms and Conditions. In a word for word 94-page adaptation, Sikoryak hilariously turns the agreement on its head – each page features an avatar of Apple cofounder Steve Jobs juxtaposed with a different classic strip such as Mort Walker’s Beetle Bailey, or a contemporary graphic novel such as Craig Thompson’s Blankets, Marjane Satrapi’s Persepolis, or Kate Beaton’s Hark! A Vagrant.