Tag Archives: semiotics

There are unnecessary page numbers (on pages that are necessary) within the front matter, i.e., Roman numerals on (Page) i, ii, iii, iv, v and vi. There is another on (page) xii. After (page) xii there are more starting on page 1 and 2. Page numbers…

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Numbering pages started out not as a tool for readers but a guide for those who physically produced books. In Latin manuscripts copied in the British Isles as far back as the eighth or ninth century, numbering was sometimes used to ensure that individual sheets of parchment were collated in the correct order. In some cases, numbers appeared on both the recto and verso pages, but other times, only one side of the page bore a number. Use of numbering was sparse. It’s been estimated that around 1450—just before the birth of printing in the West—less than 10 percent of manuscript books contained pagination.

Fifty years later, the proportion of now-printed works with pagination was much higher. Part of the change reflected the new role of page numbers. Rather than strictly being tools for compiling leaves in the proper order, by the 1510s scholars were starting to refer to page numbers of printed volumes in their own writing.

When publishers wish to distinguish between the front matter and the story, the initial title pages are not numbered, the front matter is numbered using lower-case Roman numerals (i, ii, iii, etc.) and the first page of the story or main content begins with one. The title page of the story is not numbered, but if a story is broken into multiple parts (Part I, Part II, etc.), the title page for the section may be included in the numbering but not shown on the page. The first page of Chapter One would then be numbered as page three rather than page one as would be the normal case.

The sixteenth edition of the Chicago Manual of Style calls for the beginning of the text to begin with the Arabic number 1, while the front matter that precedes it is to be numbered with lower-case Roman numerals. If the front matter is extensive and a second half-title page is included, it is to be numbered as page one and its verso as page two. If a part title is included, it is to be included in the same numbering as the text. Page numbers do not appear on part titles. Most citation systems also call for the identification of the page number from which a quote or point is drawn. For example, such usage is specified in their citation formats of both the Chicago Manual of Style, and the Bluebook.

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Triple question marks are attached to the conclusion of 23 sentences; each sentence is printed on its own page starting on p.161 (a novel)

Questionnaires have advantages over some other types of literature in that they are cheap, do not require as much effort from the questioner as verbal or telephone surveys, and often have standardized answers that make it simple to compile data. However, such standardized answers may frustrate users. Questionnaires are also sharply limited by the fact that respondents must be able to read the questions and respond to them.

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The word “Pink” is printed at the bottom left of p.32, followed (on p.33) by a 49,288 word excerpt from “The Pink Bunny”; on p.473 “Bunny” is printed at the bottom of the page (at left) followed by a sentence on p.474

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The title for the novel explains what is seen on/between p.32 through 474 and focuses on an excerpt from a novel titled “The Pink Bunny” about an abstract painter. The words “Pink” and “Bunny” are also the frame that serves to enclose the excerpt, created out of the reality of the title itself. The excerpt is followed by many blank pages, but this emptiness still exists within the frame of “Pink” and “Bunny.” The frame “Pink” and “Bunny” does not enclose the sentence on page 474.

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The paragraph that is printed on page 9 and reprinted on pages 10 thru 356 is not seen on pages 1 thru 8, and page 123


The argument of this novel is to establish that the front matter (pages 1-8) of the book does not include the primary text, a paragraph made of 17 sentences, which is printed on p.9 and subsequently reprinted on the pages referenced in the title, except page 123, where the paragraph is not seen.

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Is the neighborhood safe? The map (see example on the cover of the book) gives users a Gist of how dangerous it is in different parts of a city down to specific streets and blocks by using an intuitive color-coded scheme known as “heatmap.” Blocks with 0-30 incidents of crime per year are shown in green while the ones with 160 incidents or displayed as red…

The so-called “Dummy” or (filler or Placeholder) text is a modified edition of Dostoyevsky’s Crime and Punishment by utilizing Constance Garnett’s translation of ‘Part I’ as the base text. Dostoyevsky’s text is rearranged into verse paragraphs that form a rhetorical unit similar to that of a prose paragraph. The paragraphs that utilize the word ‘landlady’ are italicized, therefore, the “landlady” character in Dostoyevsky’s text is conceptually tied with the characters (whose names are also italicized) mentioned in the title; Ike, Benjy, and Darl (as created by William Faulkner for his novel The Sound and the Fury). The Faulkner quote (see title on the front cover) is a reference to his novel The Sound and the Fury. Faulkner readily acknowledged the difficulty of what he’d written and proposed using different-colored inks as a way to make Benjy’s section more accessible, with distinct shades assigned to its crisscrossed time-settings. Therefore, a “heatmap” (see the image on the front cover) is a graphical representation of data where the individual values contained in a matrix are represented as colors. Rainbow colormaps are often used, as humans can perceive more shades of color than they can of gray, and this would purportedly increase the amount of detail perceivable in the image. Therefore, the text of the header is composed of sentences printed in different colored inks. ​

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The story starts with the boy contemplating Father Flynn’s illness and impending death (see the sentence fragment that is printed on p.11). He is fascinated with interpreting signs and symbols, and their meaning (see the sentence fragment that is printed on p.27). Later, while the boy eats his dinner, his aunt, uncle, and old Cotter have a conversation in which the boy is informed that the priest has died (see the sentence fragment that is printed on p.34)…


(nine stories)

​The text is constructed by utilizing a nine sentence summary of James Joyce’s The Sisters and modifying the nine sentences into nine sentence fragments (see the “contents” page in the front matter). The pages (starting on p.8) that don’t have a fragment are intentionally left blank (except for the header). 

The famous red and blue dust jacket for Salinger’s Nine Stories was designed by Miriam Woods. The striking, unillustrated jacket resulted from the Salinger’s refusal to allow the publisher to depict the characters of any of the stories, in order to prevent readers from approaching the stories with preconceptions about the characters. The heart of each story is set to the beat of its characters – to unfussy accounts of the way in which they move through the world and interact with one another, to the cautious articulation of their understated feelings and nascent beliefs. This most often takes the form of a child in haphazard conversation with a newly encountered adult. His adults are characteristically broken by habit and suffering “the ruthless cruelty of conventional social judgments and behavior”, and this is a condition rendered all the more stark when positioned alongside the unassuming wisdom of the very young.
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No one has a good idea how the front and back images of a crucified man came to be on the cloth. No one has created images that match the chemistry, peculiar superficiality and profoundly mysterious three-dimensional information content of the images on the Shroud…

​No one has a good idea how the front and back images of a crucified man came to be on the cloth. No one has created images that match the chemistry, peculiar superficiality and profoundly mysterious three-dimensional information content of the images on the Shroud. Therefore, they compacted trash and recycling in a Stationary Compactor (there is an example on page 7). They put a ’tilt truck’ (see example on p.115) into a Cart Dumper (see example on p.120) of which there are two; one for trash and one for recycle. The two Cart Dumpers work by using a hydraulic arm to lift the tilt truck (through a ninety degree angle) dumping its contents into the compactor, to be crushed and compacted. Therefore, there are two photographs of the floor of The Cart Dumpers on p.27 and there are a two photographs of the Shroud of Turin on p.111. On p.45 the two photographs from page 27 are placed above the two photographs from p.111 (for a total of four photographs on one page). Therefore, they conclude (for now) that the Wear and Tear on the Floor of the Cart Dumpers and the two Images within the Shroud of Turin show the Front and Back of a scourged, crucified man. They said, “These hard times can last us so very long, If I ever get off this Killing Floor, I’ll never get down this low no more, and you say you had money, you better be sure, ‘Cause these hard times will drive you from door to door.” (After Skip James)

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