Suffix Trees

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A new novel from appropriation novelist Todd Van Buskirk. Van Buskirk uses the same approach as his novel “On the Exploration of Interrupts” by using a website called “SCIgen—The Automatic CS Paper Generator” to generate text for a whole novel. SCIgen is a program that generates random Computer Science research papers, including graphs, figures, and citations. It uses a hand-written context-free grammar to form all elements of the papers. The aim here is to maximize amusement, rather than coherence.

The plot of Suffix Trees:

In computer science, a suffix tree (also called PAT tree or, in an earlier form, position tree) is a data structure that presents the suffixes of a given string in a way that allows for a particularly fast implementation of many important string operations.

The suffix tree for a string is a tree whose edges are labeled with strings, such that each suffix of S corresponds to exactly one path from the tree’s root to a leaf. It is thus a radix tree (more specifically, a Patricia tree) for the suffixes of .

Constructing such a tree for the string S takes time and space linear in the length of S. Once constructed, several operations can be performed quickly, for instance locating a substring in S, locating a substring if a certain number of mistakes are allowed, locating matches for a regular expression pattern etc. Suffix trees also provided one of the first linear-time solutions for the longest common substring problem. These speedups come at a cost: storing a string’s suffix tree typically requires significantly more space than storing the string itself.

The concept was first introduced as a position tree by Weiner in 1973,[1] which Donald Knuth subsequently characterized as “Algorithm of the Year 1973”. The construction was greatly simplified by McCreight in 1976 ,[2] and also by Ukkonen in 1995.[3][4] Ukkonen provided the first online-construction of suffix trees, now known as Ukkonen’s algorithm, with running time that matched the then fastest algorithms. These algorithms are all linear-time for constant-size alphabet, and have worst-case running time in general.

In 1997, Martin Farach[5] gave the first suffix tree construction algorithm that is optimal for all alphabets. In particular, this is the first linear-time algorithm for strings drawn from an alphabet of integers in a polynomial range. This latter algorithm has become the basis for new algorithms for constructing both suffix trees and suffix arrays, for example, in external memory, compressed, succinct, etc.

Suffix trees can be used to solve a large number of string problems that occur in text-editing, free-text search, computational biology and other application areas.[8] Primary applications include:[8]

String search, in O(m) complexity, where m is the length of the sub-string (but with initial O(n) time required to build the suffix tree for the string)
Finding the longest repeated substring
Finding the longest common substring
Finding the longest palindrome in a string S.

Suffix trees are often used in bioinformatics applications, searching for patterns in DNA or protein sequences (which can be viewed as long strings of characters). The ability to search efficiently with mismatches might be considered their greatest strength. Suffix trees are also used in data compression; they can be used to find repeated data, and can be used for the sorting stage of the Burrows–Wheeler transform. Variants of the LZW compression schemes use suffix trees (LZSS). A suffix tree is also used in suffix tree clustering, a data clustering algorithm used in some search engines (first introduced in [9]).

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Housewife

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Free PDF of graphic novel

In Van Buskirk’s graphic novel “Leo’s Dead” it was the image of Leo dead that never changed. In “Housewife” it is the dialogue that never changes. Todd Van Buskirk recently found a beautiful piece of clipart, looking like an old advertisment artifact from the ‘50s, and decided to make a graphic novel from it. Below is the methodology used in the making of the graphic novel “Housewife.”

1. The five panels of the clipart advertisement will be seperated from the original context and placed in a different arrangement on 8 different pages.
2. All five panels don’t need to be used on the page. One panel can be used, or a variation of the five may be used as needed.
3. The size of each panel can be shaped as needed.
4. After the intial sequence of 8 pages, the artist will repeat the 8 page sequence in a different order, and re-invert these 8 pages as needed, repetitively, until the desired page count of over 200 is achieved.
5. Only one line of dialogue is used, taken from the title of the author’s previous graphic novel.

Todd Van Buskirk’s journey into conceptual art began with reading comics as a kid.

A keen memory from Todd Van Buskirk’s childhood is that of being intrigued by a Garfield comic strip, by Jim Davis. On this strip, 2 or 3 panels were repeated—the same drawing—over and over. The next time Van Buskirk noticed this effect was in Frank Miller’s work for Marvel Comics and in Miller’s graphic novel, “Ronin.” A couple years later, while working at the Rochester Public Library, Van Buskirk accidently came across David Lynch’s “The Angriest Dog in the World.” This strip uses the same drawing in each panel, the difference being the drawing in the final panel and the changing dialogue.

As Van Buskirk expanded his knowledge of art history over a period of twenty years, including a Bachelor’s in animation graphics, he relished the element of repetition within abstract expressionism, color field painting, pop art and minimalism to name a few. The element of repetition was the one element of art he was most interested in.

With the start of his first graphic novel, “There is a comic panel on p.90,” Van Buskirk started exploring minimalism with repetition in what he calls his “color-field” books. His novels, “Rochelle’s name is seen on p.120,” and “A world where the sun is locked in an eternal sunset” are other examples of this type of book. This graphic novel title continues in this tradition.

Leo’s Dead

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Free PDF of graphic novel

There is a man who has died. His name is Leo.

This is all we know for the moment.

Todd Van Buskirk’s journey into conceptual art began with reading comics as a kid.

A keen memory from Todd Van Buskirk’s childhood is that of being intrigued by a Garfield comic strip, by Jim Davis. On this strip, 2 or 3 panels were repeated—the same drawing—over and over. The next time Van Buskirk noticed this effect was in Frank Miller’s work for Marvel Comics and in Miller’s graphic novel, “Ronin.” A couple years later, while working at the Rochester Public Library, Van Buskirk accidently came across David Lynch’s “The Angriest Dog in the World.” This strip uses the same drawing in each panel, the difference being the drawing in the final panel and the changing dialogue.

As Van Buskirk expanded his knowledge of art history over a period of twenty years, including a Bachelor’s in animation graphics, he relished the element of repetition within abstract expressionism, color field painting, pop art and minimalism to name a few. The element of repetition was the one element of art he was most interested in.

In his third graphic novel Van Buskirk continues to be interested in repetition, a process also explored in many of his prose novels, such as “A world where the sun is eternally locked in an eternal sunset” and his first two graphic novels. Van Buskirk calls this type of literature his “color field” writing. Van Buskirk attempts the same with the comic book, such as the sequenced comic book offered here for your consideration.

Van Buskirk set up a few limitations before he started on the graphic novel:

1. No original art allowed. In place of original art, find a clip-art drawing.
2. Only one image is allowed in the whole graphic novel.
3. Space (negative and positive) is an element that can be changed or modified.
4. The panel itself can be modified, either through different placement of each panel, or the ability to modify the panel itself.
5. Only four page designs are allowed. This means there will be numerous repetitions of each page in order to have enough pages for a complete graphic novel.
6. The title, copyright content, and name of author is the only text allowed to hint at a textual narrative.

 

 

Artist Mark Leach made a tribute film for Leo’s Dead. Check it out! Sincere thanks to Mr. Leach.

Fake Faerie Wings

 

Author Todd Van Buskirk reveals his newest novel, a fantasy for the ages.

Combining a plot idea (from the National Novel Writing Month “Adopt a Plot” forum) with a Markov Text Generated mix of an online journal, Van Buskirk creates the ultimate faerie “trapped in a human body” story.

Rochelle is the only daughter of the ruling family of fairies . At a birthday party for her when she’s very young, the opposing race of faeries invades. She is injured when she gets separated from her guard, and is almost dead when she is found. Not wanting their only daughter to die, her parents (or some other powerful figure) performs a bit of trickery that causes her to be reborn in a different body, in the form of a human being. The text of this novel is Rochelle’s experience as a human, told in her unique voice.

You are the Dreamer Faerie. You are also creative and have an overall friendly personality. Wings: Gray and red Power: Dreams/wishes Sexual appeal: Some people think you act a little childish, but incidentally many guys find this very attrac-tive (as long as I could…and I know I’m definately not ready for any of it. I forced myself ready to live 700+ miles away from my mother, how can I expect myself to be ready for any of it. I forced myself ready to live 700+ miles away from my mother, how can I expect myself to be ready for any of it. I forced myself ready to live 700+ miles away from my mother, how can I expect myself to sleep. >>; I don’t know, I just changed the look of it…a lot. 🙂 I’m not promissing anything now. I’ve learned my lesson, and I went through all the shit people just threw where ever they felt like it. We went through all the shit people just threw where ever they felt like it. We went through the receiving room/back office and organized the damn thing. It’s amazing all the damaged goods, the halloween stuff, and other things. But while going through damaged goods we found an openned package of fabulous rainbow What kind of Dark Faerie are You? (Girls only with beautiful pics) Dreamer Faerie You are also creative and have an overall friendly personality. Wings: Gray and red Power…

The Conceptual Literature of Todd Van Buskirk