Epic Allen Ginsberg Style Poem

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Free PDF!

Conceptual artist Todd Van Buskirk offers his third book-length computer generated poem.

Excerpt:

When each soon-passing each soon-passing truth becomes truth becomes a lie. Reach a lie.

Reach out, read out, read hope amidst hope amidst the falling the falling snows: Some acrid snows: Some acrid truth, a truth, a buoyant licensee, Abundant buoyant licensee, Abundant light, receipts light, receipts of earthly of earthly woes; Then meet woes; Then meet instead one instead one earth’s dull earth’s dull history. To read, history. To read, to learn, to learn, within this within this hateful sphere When hateful sphere When men in men in arms the arms the battlegrounds foreswore Shall battlegrounds foreswore Shall any good any good in these in these tart words tart words appear?

What lost appear?

Hold hope Bill Laabs.

Hold hope abstract and abstract and count the count the tired sum O tired sum O face his face his sad tomb, sad tomb, note the note the gentle strum. gentle strum. The weather-tingèd The weather-tingèd moon unfolds moon unfolds its ray To its ray To play of play of idle art idle art when summer’s when summer’s nigh. Now try nigh. Now try and read and read this short this short life’s résumé See life’s résumé See towns through towns through peace, man’s peace, man’s chosen alibi. There chosen alibi. There men could men could fashion paradise fashion paradise that glows: This that glows: This balance-tried secure balance-tried secure autonomy, The ocean autonomy, The ocean ripe, a ripe, a friendly gust friendly gust that blows; These that blows; These hold the hold the tired mountains tired mountains earnestly. That then earnestly. That then was hailed was hailed The Perilous The Perilous Frontier When we Frontier When we bound migrants bound migrants feel the feel the monster’s roar Will monster’s roar Will ghost parades ghost parades donate a donate a thorny spear?

Tell thorny spear?

Tell much as much as love’s forgotten love’s forgotten in the in the drawer. To stretch drawer. To stretch as dead as dead and touch and touch the iron the iron plumb The motions plumb The motions granted to granted to the faceless the faceless bum. The bum. The demon saw demon saw our strength our strength in life in life today In grammar today In grammar fully shown fully shown the poets the poets die. The new-found die. The new-found milder terrorists milder terrorists sashay Because men sashay Because men rose at rose at once with once with plans so plans so high. The spread high. The spread outlines a outlines a team of team of highland crows: A highland crows: A mist at mist at noon, a noon, a cheesy cultured cheesy cultured Brie, That fiercely Brie, That fiercely hated blow, hated blow, a spurting a spurting nose; These hostile nose; These hostile thrones demand thrones demand neutrality. Of health neutrality. Of health and roles and roles within the within the trip austere When trip austere When we bound we bound migrants feel mi-grants feel the monster’s the monster’s roar Ahead do roar Ahead do pawnshop trolleys pawnshop trolleys start in start in gear?

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The Best Poem Ever Written in a High School Yearbook

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free PDF of book

The Top Reasons This is the Best Poem Ever Written in a High School Yearbook

It is MY yearbook from a Magical Year in a Magical Place: 1989. Rochester, MN.

The poem was written for a very dear friend.

The poem reminds me of my friend.
Our Memories are who we are.
Our high school, John Marshall High, was located in Rochester, MN. What a life that was. Imagine being a teen and living in Minnesota, having plenty of free transportation, assigned no responsibilities except for going to school; all your needs taken care of–It was a remarkable life for a teen.

Excerpt:

when you are still my true love, i
remember the stains!!!

i just
wanted to say “good-bye.”,
you’re trapped forever
within a prison of
air.

i am like the wings of a life
of torture open up your
hearts.

i have set myself
apart from us beyond the sky, i knew
you just don’t
want to die. your
allways there in the sun basking and
sitting there together as we
pulled up to the
next
degree. maybe what’s
next will be mine… for he
is not he gets on my
knees and
pray that you
cared you told
me that you don’t
know when you’re an
adult, expect that. i hope
you
think that i could
not speak. a single star,
beautful and
unique though
you don’t know what i have a
yearn to give so as i turn around
your all i
can moan and groan. i’ll start up my
pager and
send a message.
then i’ll
head straight to hbzchat.

pool parties, friends and
family so well, planning
isn’t hard to see is
a kiss to let me look into
your eyes, i see you
there with poise
trying not to but it is
like, such a loser!!!

i am the sun. for
she’s more
beautiful thanthee. with a sigh,
think, “heaven must be
free. but now when i see
him and i love, but
also smell
the mood, and hear the birds
calling, i hear voices in
my heart…
ooohohhh… in my world and
my dad,
and when you
are a single
star,

Basic Gettysburg

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(PDF available soon, also sold on Amazon.)

Abraham Lincoln is beaten and broken over and over, all because of one thing, one goal. It hurts, it hurts so much. Sometimes he wants to give up, to quit. Some days, the really bad ones, he wants to die. Why is he so hurt? Why does he have a huge ‘hole’ within his heart? Because of love.

And what if you could see bad ghosts? What if you had to keep them away, and had a power to do exactly that? This power would be a single emotion.

A miracle is born. All it is missing is a heart.

A very large family is fighting for the fortune, which is to be transferred to whoever is the most successful.

A girl’s boyfriend suddenly drops all contact with her after they finally go all the way.

As I look outside I see it is raining. How I wish to see you forget an umbrella with the cold rain pouring down outside… Forget it, and I will share mine with you. We’ll walk home, and talk and laugh. I’ll get to know you, and you’ll get to know me. And then, you’ll die.

Excerpt:

One morning, when Abraham when Abraham Lincoln woke Lincoln woke from troubled from troubled dreams, he dreams, he found himself found himself transformed in transformed in his bed his bed into a into a horrible vermin. horrible vermin. He lay He lay on his on his armour-like back, armour-like back, and if and if he lifted he lifted his head his head a little a little he could he could see his see his brown belly, brown belly, slightly domed slightly domed and divided and divided by arches by arches into stiff into stiff sections. The sections. The bedding was bedding was hardly able hardly able to cover to cover it and it and seemed ready seemed ready to slide to slide off any off any moment. His moment. His many legs, many legs, pitifully thin pitifully thin compared with compared with the size the size of the of the rest of rest of him, waved him, waved about helplessly about helplessly as he as he looked. What’s looked. What’s happened to happened to me? me? he thought. One morning, One morning, when Abraham when Abraham Lincoln woke Lincoln woke from troubled from troubled dreams, he dreams, he found himself found himself transformed in transformed in his bed his bed into a into a horrible vermin. horrible vermin. He lay He lay on his on his armour-like back, armour-like back, and if and if he lifted he lifted his head his head a little a little he could he could see his see his brown belly, brown belly, slightly domed slightly domed and divided and divided by arches by arches into stiff into stiff sections. The sections. The bedding was bedding was hardly able hardly able to cover to cover it and it and seemed ready seemed ready to slide to slide off any off any moment. His moment. His many legs, many legs, pitifully thin pitifully thin compared with compared with the size the size of the of the rest of rest of him, waved him, waved about helplessly about helplessly as he as he looked. What’s looked. What’s happened to happened to me? me? he thought. he thought. It wasn’t It wasn’t a dream. a dream. His room, His room, a proper a proper human room human room although a although a little too little too small, lay small, lay peacefully between peacefully between its four its four familiar walls. familiar walls. A collection A collection of textile of textile samples lay samples lay spread out spread out on the on the table – table – Lincoln was Lincoln was a travelling a travelling politician – politician – and above and above it there it there hung a hung a picture that picture that he had he had recently cut recently cut out of out of an illustrated an illustrated magazine and magazine and housed in housed in a nice, a nice, gilded frame. gilded frame. It showed It showed a lady a lady fitted out fitted out with a with a fur hat fur hat and fur and fur boa who boa who sat upright, sat upright, raising a raising a heavy fur heavy fur muff that muff that covered the covered the whole of whole of her lower her lower arm towards arm towards the viewer. the viewer.

Suffix Trees

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Free PDF

A new novel from appropriation novelist Todd Van Buskirk. Van Buskirk uses the same approach as his novel “On the Exploration of Interrupts” by using a website called “SCIgen—The Automatic CS Paper Generator” to generate text for a whole novel. SCIgen is a program that generates random Computer Science research papers, including graphs, figures, and citations. It uses a hand-written context-free grammar to form all elements of the papers. The aim here is to maximize amusement, rather than coherence.

The plot of Suffix Trees:

In computer science, a suffix tree (also called PAT tree or, in an earlier form, position tree) is a data structure that presents the suffixes of a given string in a way that allows for a particularly fast implementation of many important string operations.

The suffix tree for a string is a tree whose edges are labeled with strings, such that each suffix of S corresponds to exactly one path from the tree’s root to a leaf. It is thus a radix tree (more specifically, a Patricia tree) for the suffixes of .

Constructing such a tree for the string S takes time and space linear in the length of S. Once constructed, several operations can be performed quickly, for instance locating a substring in S, locating a substring if a certain number of mistakes are allowed, locating matches for a regular expression pattern etc. Suffix trees also provided one of the first linear-time solutions for the longest common substring problem. These speedups come at a cost: storing a string’s suffix tree typically requires significantly more space than storing the string itself.

The concept was first introduced as a position tree by Weiner in 1973,[1] which Donald Knuth subsequently characterized as “Algorithm of the Year 1973”. The construction was greatly simplified by McCreight in 1976 ,[2] and also by Ukkonen in 1995.[3][4] Ukkonen provided the first online-construction of suffix trees, now known as Ukkonen’s algorithm, with running time that matched the then fastest algorithms. These algorithms are all linear-time for constant-size alphabet, and have worst-case running time in general.

In 1997, Martin Farach[5] gave the first suffix tree construction algorithm that is optimal for all alphabets. In particular, this is the first linear-time algorithm for strings drawn from an alphabet of integers in a polynomial range. This latter algorithm has become the basis for new algorithms for constructing both suffix trees and suffix arrays, for example, in external memory, compressed, succinct, etc.

Suffix trees can be used to solve a large number of string problems that occur in text-editing, free-text search, computational biology and other application areas.[8] Primary applications include:[8]

String search, in O(m) complexity, where m is the length of the sub-string (but with initial O(n) time required to build the suffix tree for the string)
Finding the longest repeated substring
Finding the longest common substring
Finding the longest palindrome in a string S.

Suffix trees are often used in bioinformatics applications, searching for patterns in DNA or protein sequences (which can be viewed as long strings of characters). The ability to search efficiently with mismatches might be considered their greatest strength. Suffix trees are also used in data compression; they can be used to find repeated data, and can be used for the sorting stage of the Burrows–Wheeler transform. Variants of the LZW compression schemes use suffix trees (LZSS). A suffix tree is also used in suffix tree clustering, a data clustering algorithm used in some search engines (first introduced in [9]).

Housewife

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Free PDF of graphic novel

In Van Buskirk’s graphic novel “Leo’s Dead” it was the image of Leo dead that never changed. In “Housewife” it is the dialogue that never changes. Todd Van Buskirk recently found a beautiful piece of clipart, looking like an old advertisment artifact from the ‘50s, and decided to make a graphic novel from it. Below is the methodology used in the making of the graphic novel “Housewife.”

1. The five panels of the clipart advertisement will be seperated from the original context and placed in a different arrangement on 8 different pages.
2. All five panels don’t need to be used on the page. One panel can be used, or a variation of the five may be used as needed.
3. The size of each panel can be shaped as needed.
4. After the intial sequence of 8 pages, the artist will repeat the 8 page sequence in a different order, and re-invert these 8 pages as needed, repetitively, until the desired page count of over 200 is achieved.
5. Only one line of dialogue is used, taken from the title of the author’s previous graphic novel.

Todd Van Buskirk’s journey into conceptual art began with reading comics as a kid.

A keen memory from Todd Van Buskirk’s childhood is that of being intrigued by a Garfield comic strip, by Jim Davis. On this strip, 2 or 3 panels were repeated—the same drawing—over and over. The next time Van Buskirk noticed this effect was in Frank Miller’s work for Marvel Comics and in Miller’s graphic novel, “Ronin.” A couple years later, while working at the Rochester Public Library, Van Buskirk accidently came across David Lynch’s “The Angriest Dog in the World.” This strip uses the same drawing in each panel, the difference being the drawing in the final panel and the changing dialogue.

As Van Buskirk expanded his knowledge of art history over a period of twenty years, including a Bachelor’s in animation graphics, he relished the element of repetition within abstract expressionism, color field painting, pop art and minimalism to name a few. The element of repetition was the one element of art he was most interested in.

With the start of his first graphic novel, “There is a comic panel on p.90,” Van Buskirk started exploring minimalism with repetition in what he calls his “color-field” books. His novels, “Rochelle’s name is seen on p.120,” and “A world where the sun is locked in an eternal sunset” are other examples of this type of book. This graphic novel title continues in this tradition.

The Conceptual Literature of Todd Van Buskirk