Audrey Reeanactment

20120815-065936.jpg

Free PDF of novel!

“She was running. Running. She didn’t know where she was running to or why. She just knew she had to run. People were staring. Of course they were staring. It’s not every day you see a woman in a wedding dress running for her life. But was she running for her life? She just ran where her feet were taking her. But why did she run in the first place? The man told her to find her baby. He told her to run away. And she listened and she escaped from the laboratory, her only home. But was it really? Did she really have a baby? Her feet made her cross a street and she heard a horn blast. Then she had a vision. It was a mocha colored skin baby. It had black hair and it was crying. The vision closed and she found herself staring at the driver of the taxi cab. Her feet started running before she could even had the chance apologize…”

Audrey is a young woman who works on her family’s farm. Having very limited social interactions, she has turned in on herself, refusing to speak or even acknowledge others.

But one day her Mother takes her into the local town and she falls in love with the bustling streets and crowded shops.

Not long after that, she makes the decision to live in the town, running away and using her Father’s money to change her appearance; she then tries to find a job, but unfortunately the only place hiring in the entire town is her parents’ farm…

Excerpt:

She was running. Running. She didn’t know where she was running to or why. She just knew she had to run. People were staring. Of course they were staring. It’s not every day you see a woman in a wedding dress running for her life. But was she running for her life? She just ran where her feet were taking her. But why did she run in the first place? The man told her to find her baby.

He told her to run away. And she listened and she escaped from the laboratory, her only home. But was it really? Did she really have a baby? Her feet made her cross a street and she heard a horn blast. Then she had a vision. It was a mocha colored skin baby. It had black hair and it was crying.

The vision closed and she found herself staring at the driver of the taxi cab. Her feet started running before she could even had the chance…
I think last time we got you down to the Cooper Union, when you’d come to New York. Perhaps you could speak a little bit about that. First of all, last time you said you began at Cooper Union in cartooning, and then at one point the art curriculum and art itself began to impinge on you.

O.K. Now it’s beginning to come back, what happened to me at Cooper Union. I was continuing my very, kind of cocky way in my attempt to be a cartoonist going to Cooper Union to stall for time, again on the G.I. Bill. I’d taught myself to draw cartoons, and the art school I viewed as a completely separate phenomenon. It had nothing to do with cartooning or with me. It was just something I had to endure to get my G.I. Bill. What happened though was I fell in with the wrong crowd, with people who thought and had ideas.

Who were they?

It doesn’t matter, because the wrong crowd becomes the environment of the wrong crowd, an environment that for the first time in my life stressed things like thinking, examining your values. Actually, I’d begun to take education courses just before Cooper Union, and so I began to read. Now I’d read in college some, but I was a kid. Reading in college didn’t mean anything. Now I began to read as a part of required education courses and I read meaningfully. I read John Dewey. It was very important to me. It was the first time I can recall being made to think so rationally, so specifically. And then going to Cooper Union and encountering students who were all oriented toward art and therefore a little bit precocious from that point of view. They tended to think and examine their values — and teachers who would stress that kind of thing. I began to read. That was the first step. It didn’t happen right away. It happened after a while. I guess the earliest thing I can remember the idea of being excited by some of the teachers — like David Lund, Charles Cajori. These are from the first year, I think. I don’t remember whether it was the first year or not — and the general environment, and the idea being to approach painting — not to accept everything. Like Marsicano said.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s